Junk Silver For Sale

Junk Silver For Sale.

How to Buy Junk Silver.

Looking for Junk Silver for sale? The Smaulgld Junk Silver Buying Guide presents information on how and where to buy these coins.

Junk Silver Buying Guide.

On this junk silver for sale page you can compare pricing and shipping fees and buy 90% silver dimes, quarters, half dollars and dollars by clicking on the banners or links.

Buy 90 Percent Junk Silver US Coins

What is Junk Silver?

Junk silver refers to United States dimes, quarters, half dollars and dollar coins with mint marks before 1965. These coins were minted with 90% silver and were intended for everyday use. The pejorative sounding “junk” name shouldn’t put you off from these coins. Junk silver coins are convenient to buy and easily recognizable. Junk silver is puchased and sold for it silver content.

While junk silver coins have no numismatic value, these coins have attractive designs and with some persistence can be collected in near entire sets with the exception of a few key dated coins.

The decision to remove silver from the United States’ coinage was made under President Lyndon Johnson who warned those who might consider hoarding the silver coins that there would be no profit in doing and that  “Treasury has a lot of silver on hand, and it can be, and it will be used to keep the price of silver in line with its value in our present silver coin. There will be no profit in holding them out of circulation for the value of their silver content.”

The U.S. Treasury’s silver is all gone and there has been a very tidy profit for those that held onto their pre 1965 silver coins.

Buy 90% Silver U.S. Coins at BGASC.com
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Buy 90 Percent Junk Silver US Coins

Types of Junk Silver

Silver Dimes

Composition/Weight: .900 silver/.100 copper (.07234 oz. pure silver)/2.50 grams
Face Value:$.10

Barber or Liberty Head Dime
Description:Obverse:
Designer: Charles E. Barber
Mint Locations: Philadelphia, Denver, New Orleans and San Francisco
Years Minted: 1892-1916

photo of a Barber Dime designed by Charles E. Barber

The design of the Barber Dime also appeared on the quarters and half dollars from 1892-1916

The Barber dime was designed by Charles E. Barber who hit the trifecta as his design was used for the dime, quarter and half dollar! While Barber dimes are valued for their silver content, they command a higher premium than Mercury and Roosevelt dimes because they are older and were minted in lower quantities.

The largest mintage of Barber dimes was just 22 million in 1907 compared to 231 million Mercury dimes minted in 1944 and over 2 billion Roosevelt dimes minted in 1964.

Search Barber Dimes by year.

Compare Barber Dime pricing and shipping (average circulated -$5 face value roll)
Compare Barber Dime pricing and shipping (good or better condition -$5 face value roll)

Mercury or Winged Liberty Head Dime
Description: Obverse:
Designer: Adolph A. Weinman
Mint Locations: Philadelphia, Denver and San Francisco
Years Minted: 1916-1945

Mercury dime front and back

Mercury dimes were minted from 1916-1945.

The Mercury dime was designed by Adolph A. Weinman whose depiction of Lady Liberty walking appears on the Liberty Walking Half Dollar and the American Silver Eagle.

The Mercury dime is popular among collectors for its beauty and since they were minted in relatively large amounts they are accessible at affordable prices in almost all dates and mint marks.

The largest mintage of Mercury Dimes was in 1944 when approximately 340 million were minted at the U.S. Mints in Philadelphia, Denver and San Francisco.


Search Mercury Dimes by year
.

Mercury Dimes 1916-1929 $5 face value roll

Roosevelt Dime
Description: Obverse:
Designer: John R. Sinnock Mint Locations: Philadelphia, Denver and San Francisco
Years Minted: 1946-1964

obverse and reverse of Roosevelt dime

Roosevelt silver dimes are dated 1946-1964.

The Roosevelt dime follows the relatively new practice in U.S. coinage of placing former presidents on the coins. For the entire history of the United States in the 18th and 19th centuries, coins featured images of mythical individuals symbolizing liberty.

Abraham Lincoln was the first President to appear on a U.S. coin in 1909 when he began to grace the front of the penny. Since Lincoln, George Washington (the quarter in 1932) Thomas Jefferson (the nickel in 1938),  Franklin D. Roosevelt (the dime in 1946) John F. Kennedy (the half dollar in 1964) and Dwight D. Eisenhower (the dollar coin in 1971) have all appeared on U.S. coins.

Pre 1965 Roosevelt silver dimes are perfect of barter as they as instantly recognizable with the same design as the dimes that are in circulation today.

Roosevelt dimes have little numismatic value other than those that are in near perfect or proof condition.

Search uncirculated, certified and proof Roosevelt Silver Dimes.

Silver dimes are usually purchased in $1 increments or 10 dimes. A roll of dimes has a face value of $5 and contains 50 dimes.

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Compare Junk Silver Dime pricing and shipping ($200 face value)

Silver Quarters

Composition/Weight: .900 silver/.100 copper (.18084 oz. pure silver)/6.25 grams
Face Value: $.25

Barber or Liberty Head Quarter
Description: Obverse:
Designer: Charles E. Barber
Mint Locations: Philadelphia, Denver, New Orleans and San Francisco
Years Minted: 1892-1916

The Barber Quarter shares the same design as the Barber Dime and like the dime was minted in lesser quantities than the Liberty Standing and Washington quarters.

The largest mintage of Barber Quarters was 12.6 million in 1899.

Search Barber Quarters by date

Compare Barber Quarter roll prices

Liberty Standing Quarter
Description: Obverse:
Designer: Herman A. MacNeil
Mint Locations: Philadelphia, Denver and San Francisco
Years Minted:1916-1930

standing liberty quarter obverse and reverse

Standing Liberty Quarters were minted from 1916-1930.

The Liberty Standing Quarter (pictured below) was minted for only fifteen years. Many Liberty Quarters may have the dates completely obliterated due to a design flaw. From 1916-1924, the Liberty Quarter was minted with the date appearing on a raised pedestal. It became apparent after less than a decade of use that the dates on many of the coins were already showing signs of serious wear.

In 1925, the U.S. mint altered the Liberty Quarter to eliminate the raised pedestal and to place the date recessed in the same position to protect it from wear.

Liberty Standing Quarters with dates will sell for a premium over those without dates.

Certified Liberty Standing Quarters sell for extreme premiums. You can search certified Liberty Standing Quarters here.

The largest mintage of Liberty Standing Quarters was 27.8 million in 1920.

Washington Quarter
Description: Obverse:
Designer: John Flanagan
Mint Locations: Philadelphia, Denver and San Francisco
Years Minted: 1932-1964

Pre 1965 Washington quarters are instantly recognizable as they share the same design as the quarters currently in circulation. A silver quarter in 1964 would buy a gallon of gas. Today that same silver quarter is worth about the price of a gallon of gas, a testament to the value preservation of silver.

Silver quarters are usually purchased in $1 increments or four quarters. A roll of quarters has a face value of $10 and contains 40 quarters.

Search uncirculated, certified and proof Washington Silver Quarters

Buy 90 Percent Junk Silver US Coins
Compare Silver Quarter pricing and shipping ($200 face value)

Silver Half Dollars

Composition/Weight: .900 silver/.100 copper (.36169 oz. pure silver)/12.50 grams
Face Value: $.50

Barber Half Dollar
Description: Obverse:
Designer: Charles E. Barber
Mint Locations: Philadelphia, Denver, New Orleans and San Francisco
Years Minted: 1892-1915

The Barber Half Dollar shares the same design as the Barber Dime and Barber Quarter.

Search Barber Half Dollars by Date

Liberty Walking Half Dollar
Description: Obverse:
Designer: Adolph A. Weinman
Mint Locations: Philadelphia, Denver and San Francisco
Years Minted: 1916-1947

obverse and reverse of a walking liberty half dollar

The obverse of the Liberty Half Dollar shares the same design as the American Silver Eagle one dollar coin.

Search Silver Walking Liberty Half Dollars

Franklin Half Dollar
Description: Obverse:
Designer: John R. Sinnock Mint Locations: Philadelphia, Denver and San Francisco
Years Minted: 1948-1963

obverse and reverse of a franklin half dollar

Franklin Half Dollars were minted from 1948-1963.

Click here to buy rolls of Franklin half dollars

Click here to buy individual Franklin half dollars

Kennedy Half Dollar
Description: Obverse:
Designers: Gilroy Roberts and Frank Gasparro
Mint Locations: Philadelphia and Denver
Years Minted: 1964 (90% silver) 1965-1970 (40% silver)

Buy 90 Percent Junk Silver US Coins

Buy 90 Percent Junk Silver US Coins
Compare Junk Silver Pricing and Shipping ($10 face value – Mixed bag of silver dimes, quarters and half dollars)
Compare Junk Silver Pricing and Shipping ($100 face value – Mixed bag of silver dimes, quarters and half dollars)
Compare Junk Silver Pricing and Shipping ($500 face value – Mixed bag of silver dimes, quarters and half dollars)
Compare Junk Silver Pricing and Shipping ($1000 face value – Mixed bag of silver dimes, quarters and half dollars)
Compare Junk Silver Pricing and Shipping (All choices-silver dimes, quarters, half dollars and silver dollars )

Silver Dollars

Buy Morgan Silver Dollars

The most common silver dollars are the Morgan and Peace dollars. These coins were minted from 1878-1935.

Composition/Weight: .900 silver/.100 copper (.77344 oz. pure silver)/26.73 grams
Face value: $1

Morgan Dollars
Description: Obverse: the date and Liberty Head with the words “E Pluribus Unum”
Reverse:Picture of an eagle clasping arrows and olive branch with the words “One Dollar” “In God We Trust” “United States of America”
Designer: George T. Morgan
Mint Locations: Philadelphia, New Orleans, Carson City, Denver and San Francisco
Years Minted: 1878-1904 and 1921

Buy Morgan Silver Dollars

The Morgan Silver Dollar began production at the United State Mint in 1878. In 1878 it was produced in Philadelphia, Carson City and San Francisco. Morgan Silver Dollars would also be produced in 1921 in New Orleans and Denver.

Morgan Silver Dollars contain a little over three quarters of an ounce of silver.

The Morgan Silver Dollar was designed by George T. Morgan who had been a pupil of William Wyon of the Royal Mint in London.

In 1918, Congress passed the Pittman Act, that provided for the destruction of over 270 million Morgan silver dollars which were no longer in production, to support the price of silver. The Morgan silver dollars were melted down and the silver bullion sold to England to alleviate its silver shortage. Under the Pittman Act, starting in 1921 through 1933, the U.S. would buy back 270 million ounce of silver from U.S. mining companies at a subsidized price of $1 an ounce in order to replace the Morgan Silver Dollars destroyed.

The production of the Morgan Silver Dollar recommenced for one year in 1921. Later that year, a new US silver dollar, the Peace Dollar was introduced and was minted from 1921-1928 and in 1934 and 1935.

Peace Dollars
Description: Obverse: the date and the words “Liberty” and “In God we Trust” with a crowned female head in the center. Reverse: The words “United States of America” “e pluribus unum” and “peace” and “one dollar with a perched bald eagle in the center.
Designer: Anthony de Francisci
Mint Locations: Philadelphia, Denver and San Francisco
Years Minted: 1921-1928/1934-35

Buy 90% Silver U.S. Coins at BGASC.com
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Buy 90% Silver U.S. Coins at Money Metals Exchange

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Buy Morgan Silver Dollars

Silver Buying Tip: Compare Pricing and Shipping of Morgan Silver Dollars

Compare pricing and shipping on a variety of Morgan Silver dollars here and here.

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